High-nicotine dependent smokers less likely to quit after lung cancer screening

Lung cancer screenings that incorporate smoking cessation treatment hold the potential to impact smoking cessation in high-risk smokers, according to a new study in the journal CHEST®.

Glenview, IL – Tobacco cessation is considered the single most effective primary prevention strategy for reducing the risk of lung cancer death in patients. Having a better understanding of smokers and their characteristics can help to better identify their downstream outcomes, determine predictors of continued smoking and develop a personalized treatment plan. A new study in the May edition of the journal CHEST® investigated the relationship between the degree of nicotine dependence and the likelihood to quit smoking and clinical cancer and mortality outcomes in a cohort of screened patients. The study found that patients with a higher nicotine dependence are less likely to quit post-lung cancer screening.

Read more at Chestnet.org 

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